uispeccoll:

John Greenleaf Whittier (1897-1892) was an American poet, editor, and political activist.  During the early part of his career as a poet Whittier established the Liberty party (1840), helped support John C. Fremont’s presidential bid (1856), and founded Atlantic Monthly (1857).  Perhaps as indirect result of these activities, Whittier’s poetry was not well received by the public and critics until after the Civil War when his poetry focused on religion and nature (poets.org).

His poem “Mabel Martin” was printed as a single illustrated volume in 1876 by J.R. Osgood & Co.  It is in a beautiful blind tooled leather binding with gilt foreedges, gold end bands, and vibrant marbled paper.  “Mabel Martin” is about the daughter of woman who was tried as a witch.  She is an outcast in her community and prays for death. The poem concludes with her betrothal to Esek Harden.

Jillian S.

PS3259 .M33 1876

Every time that I think that I can get away with using Pages, I end up having to either convert it to .docx or send it up to Google Docs. I wish that everyone liked Pages as much as I do.

Every time that I think that I can get away with using Pages, I end up having to either convert it to .docx or send it up to Google Docs. I wish that everyone liked Pages as much as I do.

rockhalllibrary:

Happy Birthday, Steve Jones!

Stephen PhilipSteve" Jones (born 3 September 1955) is an English rock guitarist, singer and actor, best known as guitarist and founding member of punk rock band the Sex Pistols. Learn more about this 2006 inductee at the Library and Archives.

Audio clip: Sex Pistols, “Holidays in the Sun,” recorded at the Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, CA, on January 14, 1978. From the Frederick S. Boros Audio Recordings.

tonightsbroadcast:

I spent the greatest afternoon at the University of Maryland’s Radio Broadcast Archives today!  Michael Henry, Research Specialist in the Mass Media and Culture Collection gave us a tour of the broadcast library and special collections, and provided an incredible amount of information on the history, formats, and stars of old time radio.  Above are a few photos I snapped during the tour - and Mr. Henry was so kind to pull out some Jack Benny outtake stills of a photo shoot from Radio Times.  I’ve worked with digitizing video/audio collections in the past, but had never seen anything as extensive as UMD’s holdings: they had thousands of photographs, books, radio scripts, and audio recordings in every media imaginable (and some even unimaginable- wire recordings, for example).  in addition to radio, their collection contains such a huge wealth of material on television, the history of humor, magazine serials, memorabilia, biographies, etc. etc.  Their catalogue is available to view online, and if anyone interested in broadcast history is near the Maryland/DC area - I couldn’t give a stronger recommendation to visit these archives.  A big thank you again to UMD, if you’re not already following them on Tumblr, make sure to do so!

(Also:  If you’re wondering about the Mae West photo and her ban from the radio waves… see the next post!)